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Chris Rogers
Chris Rogers

In A Lawsuit Brought By The Motion Picture Association Of America, U ##VERIFIED##



The MPA has advocated for the motion picture and television industry, with the goals of promoting effective copyright protection, reducing piracy, and expanding market access. It has worked to curb copyright infringement, including attempts to limit the sharing of copyrighted works via peer-to-peer file sharing networks and by streaming from pirate sites. Former United States Ambassador to France Charles Rivkin is the chairman and CEO.




In A Lawsuit Brought By The Motion Picture Association Of America, U



The MPA was founded as the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA) in 1922 as a trade association of member motion picture companies. At its founding, MPPDA member companies produced approximately 70 to 80 percent of the films made in the United States.[5] Former Postmaster General Will H. Hays was named the association's first president.[6]


About the MPAAThe Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video and television industries from its offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Its members include: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Universal City Studios LLC; and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.


Douglas C. Dow. 2009. Motion Picture Ratings [electronic resource]. The First Amendment Encyclopedia, Middle Tennessee State University (accessed Feb 07, 2023). -amendment/article/1247/motion-picture-ratings


About the MPAA:The Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video and television industries from its offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Its members are: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Universal City Studios LLC; and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.


Specifically, Doug is a driving force in First Amendment and entertainment industry lawsuits; anti-SLAPP motions; copyright and trademark infringement actions; new and traditional media law issues; invasion of privacy and defamation claims; and publicity rights disputes. He is also a sought-after source for advice and commentary on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.


The Paramount case and the resulting decrees significantly altered the structure of the motion picture industry. First, the Supreme Court ordered and the decrees mandate a separation between film distribution and exhibition by requiring the five defendants that then owned movie theatres to divest either their distribution operations or their theatres. Going forward, the decrees prohibited those defendants from both distributing movies and owning theatres without prior court approval. Second, the Supreme Court and the decrees outlawed various motion picture distribution practices including block booking (bundling multiple films into one theatre license), circuit dealing (entering into one license that covered all theatres in a theatre circuit), resale price maintenance (setting minimum prices on movie tickets), and granting overbroad clearances (exclusive film licenses for specific geographic areas).


As part of its review, the Department invited interested persons, including motion picture producers, distributors, and exhibitors to provide the Division with information or comments relevant to whether the Paramount Decrees, in whole or in part, still are necessary to protect competition in the motion picture industry.


Williams & Connolly represents major newspapers, news magazines, television networks, book publishers, motion picture studios, technology companies, and individual journalists and artists in every type of litigation. Our current and recent clients include: The Washington Post, ABC, NBC, CNN, News Corp., Fox Television Stations, Inc., 21st Century Fox, Fox News, AOL, Time Warner Inc., Time, HBO, The Walt Disney Co., Universal City Studios, Paramount Pictures, MGM Studios, Sony Pictures Entertainment, the Atlantic Monthly, Simon & Schuster, Beacon Communications, the Motion Picture Association of America, the Recording Industry Association of America, and Google. The firm has defended hundreds of cases involving the defense of claims for libel, invasion of privacy, and related torts.


The firm has a long history of representing major television networks, motion picture studios, publications and individuals in defamation, privacy and related claims, including representation before the Supreme Court.


A gentleman named Timothy Forsythe is the named plaintiff in the lawsuit that has been brought against the MPAA, though the brief claims that he represents a "class of similarly situated individuals." If successful, the suit would effectively ban smoking in all movies rated PG-13 or lower. The plaintiff's side argues that movies which depict smoking have a major impact on the young people watching them, and as such movies that show smoking are not suitable for them. The MPAA is holding that banning smoking in some films is effectively a free speech issue, which is protected by the first amendment to the Constitution. However, the plaintiff says that MPAA ratings are not protected by the first amendment because they qualify as false advertising.


FastVDO (District of Delaware). Successfully represented nine media and entertainment companies in patent infringement lawsuits involving video compression. An early summary judgment motion brought the case to a close.


In the Grokster case, a group of record and motion picture companies, lead by MGM, sued the peer-to-peer facilitators Grokster and StreamCast (the providers of the Morpheus file sharing software) for facilitating violations of the Copyright Act perpetuated by Grokster's and StreamCast's users. For purposes of this article, Grokster and StreamCast will just be referred to as "Grokster." Grokster created software that allowed the easy and fast transfer of almost any type of digital file, although most users used it to illegally download copyrighted music and movies. Unlike Napster, Grokster did not maintain any central registry of files. The music industry (through the Recording Industry Association of America) and the movie industry (through the Motion Picture Association of America) has been pursuing large-scale illegal downloaders directly for some time now. By contrast, in this case, MGM and the other plaintiffs did not accuse Grokster of infringing copyrights directly, but instead accused Grokster of contributory and vicarious infringement; that is, MGM attempted to hold Grokster responsible for the copyright infringements of its users.


When television first took off in the 1950s, the only means of preserving video footage was through kinescope, a process in which a special motion picture camera photographed a television monitor. Kinescope film took hours to develop and made for poor quality broadcasts. So most television networks just made live broadcasts direct from the studio. But in countries with several time zones, live broadcast was a problem. In the U.S., for example, the 6 p.m. news broadcast in New York, if aired direct, would be on at 3 p.m. Pacific time in Los Angeles. The only solutions were to repeat the live broadcast three hours later for LA, or to develop the kinescope film of the first broadcast and rush to air it on time. There was a pressing need for new recording technology.


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