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Christian Hall
Christian Hall

Europe From Above



Thanks to the advent of drone technology, it's easier than ever to gain a new perspective on some of the most beautiful terrain in the world. From bustling cities you know and love to the sprawling countryside, these photos capture a unique look of Europe's diverse and beautiful nations. Here are some of our favorite aerial shots of Europe from above.




Europe From Above



While Dubrovnik remains the showstopper of Croatia, the country is filled with plenty of port cities and villages that are equally stunning. Jelsa is one example. This tiny town on the island of Hvar serves as a quiet spot for daytrippers looking for a reprive from the busier Hvar Town. Red-roofed buildings cluster around the pristine turquoise waters, making this corner of the Dalmatian Coast a top bucket list destination.


Beyond seaside castles, the coastline of the United Kingdom is home to plenty of stunning natural wonders. The Old Harry Rocks are one of these gorgeous spots worth a look. The chalk formations extend from Isle of Purbeck in Dorset, southern England and are part of the UNESCO-protected Jurassic Coast.


Lined with trees and red-roofed buildings, Avenida da Liberdade is a central boulevard in Lisbon and one of the best shopping streets in all of Europe. While its pavements and stores can be packed tight with fellow shoppers and tourists during the busy season, the view from above is calm and serene.


The space station orbits about 250 miles (400 km) above Earth, and it captures the view down below with several onboard cameras. Traveling at about 17,500 mph (28,000 km/h) relative to the ground, it whizzes around the globe every 92 minutes. But the view is not the same every 92 minutes, because the space station's flight path shifts slightly with each orbit.


Hanneke Weitering is an editor at Space.com with 10 years of experience in science journalism. She has previously written for Scholastic Classroom Magazines, MedPage Today and The Joint Institute for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After studying physics at the University of Tennessee in her hometown of Knoxville, she earned her graduate degree in Science, Health and Environmental Reporting (SHERP) from New York University. Hanneke joined the Space.com team in 2016 as a staff writer and producer, covering topics including spaceflight and astronomy. She currently lives in Seattle, home of the Space Needle, with her cat and two snakes. In her spare time, Hanneke enjoys exploring the Rocky Mountains, basking in nature and looking for dark skies to gaze at the cosmos. "}; var triggerHydrate = function() window.sliceComponents.authorBio.hydrate(data, componentContainer); var triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate = function() if (window.sliceComponents.authorBio === undefined) var script = document.createElement('script'); script.src = ' -9-5/authorBio.js'; script.async = true; script.id = 'vanilla-slice-authorBio-component-script'; script.onload = () => window.sliceComponents.authorBio = authorBio; triggerHydrate(); ; document.head.append(script); else triggerHydrate(); if (window.lazyObserveElement) window.lazyObserveElement(componentContainer, triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate, 1500); else console.log('Could not lazy load slice JS for authorBio') } }).catch(err => console.log('Hydration Script has failed for authorBio Slice', err)); }).catch(err => console.log('Externals script failed to load', err));Hanneke WeiteringSocial Links NavigationEditorHanneke Weitering is an editor at Space.com with 10 years of experience in science journalism. She has previously written for Scholastic Classroom Magazines, MedPage Today and The Joint Institute for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After studying physics at the University of Tennessee in her hometown of Knoxville, she earned her graduate degree in Science, Health and Environmental Reporting (SHERP) from New York University. Hanneke joined the Space.com team in 2016 as a staff writer and producer, covering topics including spaceflight and astronomy. She currently lives in Seattle, home of the Space Needle, with her cat and two snakes. In her spare time, Hanneke enjoys exploring the Rocky Mountains, basking in nature and looking for dark skies to gaze at the cosmos.


Bulgaria is one of the six countries that will be the focus of National Geographic. The team once again takes to the skies to showcase spectacular aerial views of the Old Continent as part of the new six-part season of "Europe from Above".


One of them is the photographer Vladislav Terziiski, who is the main drone pilot involved in filming the Bulgarian episode. In an interview with BNR's Hristo Botev programme, he gave spoilers on what to expect from the hour-long documentary adventure.


"We will see quite a variety of footage against the backdrop of nine short stories set in different locations in Bulgaria, filmed over the four seasons. We will climb the highest peak in our country - Musala, in winter. We will also be at the sea - in the fishermen's village Chengene Skele near Burgas, which was built entirely from waste and recycled materials, an example of the efforts of the local people to remove plastic refuse from the Black Sea beaches. Basically, the film tries to show the diversity of our country, refracted through really interesting human stories.


In addition to drone footage, we also have footage from the ground and footage captured with an action camera that is mounted on an animal, a person, or placed in a specific location to be able to shoot from a specific vantage point."


The story of Bulgaria "from above" begins with the buried secrets of the ancient city of Perperikon. Viewers will have the rare chance to observe the fieldwork of archaeologist Prof. Nikolay Ovcharov and his team.


With every human story and professional experience you learn something new that expands your knowledge of your own country, says the photographer. As for what insight viewers will get from the film about Bulgaria, he says:


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Europe from Above provides spectacular aerial footage that gives a unique insight into how tradition, engineering and natural wonders have shaped the continent, helping to paint a dynamic portrait of the region and the people who keep it alive.


Europe from Above is produced for National Geographic by Windfall Films (part of the Argonon Group). For Windfall Films, Mark Bridge is Series Producer and Carlo Massarella is Executive Producer.


In western Turkey, the Cannakale Bridge is a ground-breaking mega-structure, that once finished, will link Europe and Asia to become the longest mid-span suspension bridge in the world. From the air, the production team joins the engineers working on one of the most ambitious construction projects in history and witnesses the building of one of the giant support towers being lifted into place at a height of over 300 metres. The team then joins Archaeologists as they attempt to uncover the secrets of the ancient Greek town of Hierapolis, that from above appears divided in two, not by snowy ground, but by mineral deposits formed from natural springs. The birds eye view will reveal crystal-white terraces brimming with warm water and cascading waterfalls.


National Geographic is broadcasting the fourth set of episodes from its famous TV series Europe From Above. Using cutting-edge drone technology, viewers are taken on a visual journey across Denmark, Serbia, Scotland, Bulgaria, Belgium and Romania, to view not only the natural landscape but learn about their culture.


Footage taken in Bulgaria includes images from a drone over Perperikon, Varna, Veliko Tarnovo, Sofia, and Mount Musala by Vladislav Terziyski. In Romania, images include the restoration of traditional timber roofs of a church in the Carpathian Mountains.


This spectacular aerial journey reveals the United Kingdom, as we've never seen it before. Flying cameras soar over the Giant's Causeway as jet-ski litter pickers tidy up the coast. Daredevil gardeners handle chainsaws while hanging from the Eden Project roof and we glide through the London skyline as one of the city's tallest skyscrapers gets a spring clean.


We are a bespoke aerial film production company based in the French Alps. We bring a personal and effective approach to every project we work on, which is why our clients keep coming back for more. Success from above.


For the fourth series, National Geographic take to the skies above Denmark, Serbia, Scotland, Bulgaria, Belgium and Romania. Using cutting-edge drone technology, viewers will be taken on a visual journey across each country to view not only the natural landscape but learn about their culture. Each episode focuses on one country and the first stop for Europe From Above is Scotland.


While many will be enjoying the astounding views of Europe from the comfort of their sofa, National Geographic gave Express.co.uk the chance to learn how the episode was made first hand and experience incredible views of the highlands for ourselves.


EconPapers FAQ Archive maintainers FAQ Cookies at EconPapers Format for printing The RePEc blog The RePEc plagiarism page Economic Integration from Above and Below with the Evidence of Japanese MNEs in EuropeKen-ichi AndoChapter 5 in International Handbook on the Economics of Integration, Volume III, 2011 from Edward Elgar PublishingAbstract:With this Handbook, Miroslav Jovanović has provided readers with both an excellent stand-alone original reference book as well as an integral part of a comprehensive three-volume set. This introduction into a rich and expanding academic and practical world of international economic integration also provides a theoretical and analytical framework to the reader, presenting select analytical studies and encouraging further research.Keywords: Economics and Finance; Urban and Regional Studies (search for similar items in EconPapers)Date: 2011References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc Citations: Track citations by RSS feedDownloads: (external link) (application/pdf)Related works:This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/TextPersistent link: :elg:eechap:14137_5Ordering information: This item can be ordered from -elgar.comObfuscate( 'e-elgar.co.uk', 'sales' )Access Statistics for this chapterMore chapters in Chapters from Edward Elgar PublishingBibliographic data for series maintained by Darrel McCalla (Obfuscate( 'e-elgar.co.uk', 'darrel' )). var addthis_config = "data_track_clickback":true; var addthis_share = url:" :elg:eechap:14137_5"Share This site is part of RePEc and all the data displayed here is part of the RePEc data set. Is your work missing from RePEc? Here is how to contribute. Questions or problems? Check the EconPapers FAQ or send mail to Obfuscate( 'oru.se', 'econpapers' ). EconPapers is hosted by the Örebro University School of Business. 041b061a72


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